Plantar Fasciitis is a painful condition caused by repetitive strains or overuse of the tendon which runs from under your heel to the front of your foot.

Signs & Symptoms

  • Pain / tenderness on and under the heel and arch of the foot areas
  • Pain worse first thing in the morning until the muscles warm & free
  • Tenderness & Pain on the heel
  • If untreated the pain experienced first thing in the morning will worsen and become prolonged
  • Foot pain or high-arched feet may cause a gait change, which can cause additional pain.

Causes

  • Running, dancing or jumping
  • Very tight calf muscles
  • Hi or low arches
  • Being overweight
  • Footwear which does not provide arch support

What can you do?

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Ice Therapy
  • Rest
  • Tape the foot
  • PF Night Splint
  • Switch to Barefoot shoes
  • Massage & Stretches – as part of your  sports massage treatment I prescribe specific stretches to improve and rehabilitate your sports injuries. I also offer targeted advice to improve your overall balance, strength and alignment allowing for safe, structured progression within your chosen sport.

Request your sports massage for Plantar Fasciitis HERE

or call 07790 774 239 to book.

Recover from Plantar Fasciitis

After sleeping or resting your plantar fascia tighten and shorten. Hence the dreadful pain with your first steps out of bed. The exercise below helps make the plantar fascia more supple and flexible by stretching the muscles on the sole of the foot whilst giving a gentle massage effect. It should be done  immediately after waking up.

  • Sit barefoot on a chair or the edge of your bed and place a golf ball, tennis ball, or rolling pin under the foot.
  • Whilst seated roll the ball with the arch of the foot back and forth from your heel to the toes, for 30-40 seconds and apply as much pressure as you an without causing more pain.
  • If this feels okay, you can take the exercise further by doing this exercise while you are standing up, making the exercise a lot stronger.
  • Keep doing this for about 4 minutes.

Prevent Plantar Fasciitis

Regular Massage
A regular massage with a seasoned professional will keep your muscles flexible and strong which will help you prevent injury, reach new targets and improve your personal bests. Don’t wait until you have an in jury… an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

Warm up properly
This means not only stretching prior to a given athletic event, but a  gradual rather than sudden increase in volume and intensity over the course of  the training season. A frequent cause of plantar fasciitis is a sudden increase  of activity without suitable preparation.

Avoid activities that cause pain
Running on steep terrain, excessively hard or soft  ground, etc can cause unnatural biomechanical strain to the foot, resulting in  pain. This is generally a sign of stress leading to injury and should be  curtailed or discontinued.

Shoes & arch support
Athletic demands placed on the feet, particularly during running events, are extreme. Injury results when your feet are inflexible, tight or weak. Switch to Barefoot shoes which are light and flexible. Regular Foot exercises/ Stretches will greatly reduce the chance of suffering with Plantar Fasciitis.

Rest and rehabilitation
Probably the most important curative therapy for  cases of plantar fasciitis is thorough rest. The injured athlete must be  prepared to wait out the necessary healing phase, avoiding temptation to return  prematurely to athletic activity.

Strengthening exercises
Below are two simple strength exercises to help condition the muscles, tendons and joints around the foot and ankle.

Plantar Rolling: Place a small tennis ball under the  arch of the affected foot. Slowly move the foot back and forth allowing the tennis  ball to roll around under the arch. This activity will help to stretch,  strengthen and massage  the affected area.
Toe Walking: Stand upright in bare feet and  rise up onto the toes and front of the foot. Balance in this position and walk  forward in slow, small steps. Maintain an upright, balanced posture, staying as high as possible with each step. Complete three sets of the exercise, with a short  break in between sets, for a total of 20 meters.

I can help you!

My sports massage studio is in Truro:
The Old Bakery Studios
Blewetts Wharf (just past radio Cornwall)
Truro.

To book your sports massage in Truro with me please call 07790 774 239

My 10 top tips for improved posture and the health of your back

As a child, were you told “Stand up straight!” or “Don’t slouch!”. It turns out that whoever said it, they were right all along! Having poor posture when walking, sitting, working or driving can have a negative impact on your life including:

  • Pain in your back and shoulders.
  • Shallow breathing.
  • The appearance of lacking self confidence.

Click HERE to book your bespoke Back Pain Reducing Realignment treatment

What is posture?

Posture is defined as the way the body is carried. Good posture means carrying your body in a way that puts the least strain on muscles and ligaments. Poor posture can cause pain in the neck and back, and can sometimes lead to injury. Making changes to your posture is a great way of improving your overall appearance as well as your health.

Many of the reasons for bad posture can be fixed and others, like pregnancy, go away in time. Some of the reasons are:

  • Poor habits – sitting and standing incorrectly
  • Weakened muscles
  • Obesity – The extra pounds add strain to your skeleton and muscles.
  • Pregnancy
  • Ill-fitting shoes (like high heels)
  • Reduced muscle and joint flexibility (this can happen with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis)

Why Is Good Posture Important?

Good posture is good for your health in a number of ways. Standing and sitting with correct posture prevents strain and overuse of neck and back muscles, it helps the muscles work more efficiently

Good posture also has other more subtle benefits. When you stand properly, the body tends to look taller and slimmer. Good posture can also make you look more confident. And, we all know, when you look confident, you feel confident.

As most of us are seated at desks for most of the day, it is very important to have correct posture while seated.

The combination of regular stretching and massage help to improve and maintain your posture .

Are There Warning Signs Of Back Pain Caused By Poor Posture?

Back pain may be the result of poor posture if the back pain is worse at certain times of day or week. If you experience back pain at certain times of the week, but not at the weekend, this may be the problem.

Click HERE to book your bespoke Back Pain Reducing Realignment treatment

The signs to be aware of are:

  • sudden back pain that is experienced with a new job, a new office chair, or a new car
  • pain that starts in the neck and moves downwards into the upper back, lower back and extremities and pain that goes away after changing positions while sitting or standing.

Keep active

As muscles get tired, slouching, slumping, and other poor posture positions occur. This then puts extra pressure on the neck and back. In order to maintain a relaxed yet supported posture, switch positions frequently. Take a two-minute break from your desk every hour to stretch your limbs.

Keep the body in alignment while sitting at your desk and standing

  • Distribute body weight evenly to the front, back, and sides of the feet while standing.
  • While sitting in at your desk, take advantage of the chair’s features.
  • Sit up straight and align the ears, shoulders, and hips in one vertical line.
  • Any single position, even a position with good posture, will tire your muscles. Leaning forward with a straight back can alternate with sitting back, using the back support of the office chair to take some of the strain from your muscles.
  • Also be aware of (and avoid) unbalanced postures such as crossing legs unevenly while sitting, leaning to one side, hunching the shoulders and craning the neck.

Use Posture-Friendly Props & Ergonomic Chairs When Sitting

  • Supportive ergonomic “props” can help to take the strain and load off the spine.
  • Lumbar Rolls or pillows offer great support to the lower back when seated at a desk.

Increase Your General Awareness For Great Posture

Being aware of posture at work, at home, and at play is a vitally important step towards instilling good posture techniques. This includes making conscious connections between incidents of back pain and what position you were in at the time.

Use Exercise To Help Prevent Injury & Promote Great Posture

Regular physical exercise such as walking, swimming and cycling will help the body stay in good condition, while specific strengthening exercises will help the muscles surrounding the back to stay strong.

There are also specific exercises that will help maintain good posture. A balance of trunk strength with back muscles about 30% stronger than abdominal muscles is essential to help support the upper body and maintain good posture.

Wear Supportive Footwear When Standing

Avoid regularly wearing high heels, which can affect the body’s center of gravity and change the alignment of the entire body, affecting back support and posture.

Be Aware Of Your Posture When Moving Or Stationary

Walking, talking on the phone, and typing are all moving activities that require attention to posture. It is important to maintain good posture even while moving to avoid injury. Back injuries are especially common while twisting and/or lifting and often occur because of awkward movement and control of the upper body weight alone.

Do re-check your posture whenever you think of it! I often find myself reverting to old habits particularly when using laptops!!

Create The ‘Right’ Environment & Workspace Conducive To You

It does require a bit of time but the results will be well worth it. Undue strain will be placed on the spine unless your office chair, desk, keyboard, and computer screen are in the correct position.

Avoid The ‘Over-Protecting’ Posture

Remember that it is important to maintain an overall relaxed posture to avoid restricting movements by tensing muscles and adopting a stiff posture.

For people who already have some back pain, it is a natural tendency to try to limit movements to avoid the potential pain associated with movement. But, unless there is a fracture or other serious problem, the spine is designed for movement and any limitation in motion over a long period of time creates more pain and will make the overall situation worse.

You can always spot someone in pain when they walk ahead of you in the street… so take a look at yourself. If you are frightened of pain you walk in an unusual manor. It tends to be a stiff, tense and unnatural poise.

The way to change this is to relax. Hold your head up so it is horizontal to the floor,ensure your jaw is not tense, check your breathing and walk (picking your feet up properly).

I completely believe it is possible not only to eradicate most if not all of the chronic aches and pains of a bad back. Why, because I’ve done it myself!

I really have been there and done it all with my bad back, including back surgery! For those of you who are about to switch off at the point of surgery, please allow me to continue…

Back Surgery Was Really Not The Answer!

That just took away the ‘result’ of the problem without ever addressing the cause. It’s taken me 10 years after my op to have put it together in a package to help fellow sufferers.

  • I had to address the physical aspect of the back pain and Sciatica.
  • I had to adjust many aspects of my lifestyle (mostly silly things if I’m honest)
  • I had to address the fear of the re-occurrence of pain, the ‘knowing’ when it was going to ‘go’
  • I needed prevention strategies that were easy and worked
  • I had to address the impact of my bad back and the fear of its re-occurrence because it affected me in so many ways. My back impacted on my work. My work impacted on my finances. My finances impacted on my home life and family.

I’m sure you resonate with this on some or many of these levels! I just wanted you to know that I’ve contended with the lot, and just like you I struggled.

But that is in the past now, even when I do something that in the past would have debilitated me for days if not weeks, I am in a position that I am able to do most things and indeed partake in a far more active lifestyle than I would ever have imagined, probably moreso than before in many ways!

Click HERE to book your bespoke Back Pain Reducing Realignment treatment

General sports

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sports injuries are generically classified as either traumatic or overuse injuries. My physical therapy sessions address the painful conditions of Plantar Faciatis, Shin Splints,Runners Knee, Cramp, Rotator Cuff Injuries, Achillies Tendonitis, IT Band Syndrome, Wrist Tendonitis, or  Repetitive Stress Injuries, Sciatic Nerve Pain (Sciatica) Tennis Elbow & Golfers elbow (although this condition is very likely to have other associated origins other than tennis or golf), whiplash, muscle strains and general sports injuries.

Many types of injury are caused by having a hard contact with something- this often causes ligament, tendon or bone damage.

A strain (small tear) in the muscle or ligament tissue will give you inflammation, pain, localised heat, swelling, redness and loss of function. This generally is the same in all cases. The inflammation will last 5 days from the initial trauma/ event.

How do you prevent injury?

Pre-activity: Warm up effectively, stretch

Post-activity: Warm down and stretch.

Have weekly or fortnightly massage treatments to ensure the muscle is not tense to start with. This will not only prevent further damage to a tense muscle, but will allow you to ‘up your game’ I have had serious sports/ gym clients present with the severest tension, who are under the threat of a serious injury, without even realising it! Their response is always the same- whilst the initial treatment uncomfortable at times, the outcome was dynamic, stamina improved and the ability to train ‘harder’ with ease very notable and satisfying.

What Do You Do If You Injure Yourself?

Welcome to R-I-C-E!

The following regime will help speed up your recovery and reduce your pain! Until the inflammation has eased follow the simple guidelines below:

R- Rest:

Reduce or stop using the injured area for 48 hours. If you have a leg injury, you may need to stay off of it completely.

I-Ice:

Put an ice pack on the injured area for 20 minutes at a time, 4 to 8 times per day. Use a cold pack, ice bag, or a plastic bag filled with crushed ice that has been wrapped in a towel.

C- Compression:

Compression of an injured ankle, knee, or wrist may help reduce the swelling. These include bandages such as elastic wraps, special boots, air casts and splints. Ask your doctor which is best.

E- Elevation:

Keep the injured area elevated above the level of the heart. Use a pillow to help elevate an injured limb.

Anti-inflammatory gels or tablets (e.g. Ibuprofen) may be useful to help with pain relief

Massage treatment, coupled with targeted mobilisation and stretches will get you on the road to recovery.

Does general muscle tension affect my sporting ability, even though I stretch?

This is a question I get asked frequently. The answer is most definitely YES!!!

The problem is that until you get a ‘decent’ massage treatment you are (generally) unaware of the level of tension held in the body. When you exercise you put pressure on the muscles to ‘perform’ and ‘achieve’ however, if there is a serious underlying tension already you are much closer to injury without even realising!

What Causes Muscle Tension?

Physical & (you may be surprised to read) emotional stress can create the tension within the affected muscles. If this tension remains for too long it can lead to repetitive strain and inflammation in the area which results in a pain/spasm cycle. Therefore, it is important to get at the source of the tension and take preventative steps for eliminating the stress and helping the muscles return to their normal state of relaxation.

 

To avoid sports burnout you need to change your nutritional intake, otherwise you can create the symptoms of burnout whether you are a keen sports person or couch potato!

How can you avoid Sports Burnout?

Regular exercise has countless health benefits, but it can mean you need to check and ‘tweak’ your nutritional intake. The correct balance will help you maintain your energy levels and protect you from ‘burn out’ and injury.

It is crucial to keep an eye on ‘Vitamin B Complex’, this is because their group combined role is the release of energy from food and help prevent burnout. If you have an active lifestyle and partake regularly in sports you will probably require slightly higher amounts of Vitamins B1, B3 & B5.

What should you be taking?

Click on the individual below links to find out more:

Calcium

Zinc

Iron

Vitamin B complex:

Vitamin C

Remember, exercise generates free radicals and can take its toll on your immune system especially if you have a stressed  & busy lifestyle. Vitamin C has a key role for all sports participants.

Vitamin E

What Is Ilio-Tibial Band syndrome (IT Band friction syndrome)?

ITB Syndrome is a common cause of knee pain and hip pain in sports participants. Knee pain is most commonly felt along the outside (lateral) knee and the lower thigh. ITB syndrome may also result in a nagging or acute pain on the outside of the hip.

Click HERE to book your bespoke treatment

What Causes IT Band Syndrome?

ITB syndrome is typically caused by inflammation of the iliotibial band and is a common injury in runners or other athletes that run for training or during their sports. The IT band acts primarily as a stabilizer during running and may become irritated from overuse.

The pain is typically felt on the outside (lateral) aspect of the knee or lower thigh, but may be felt near the hip, and is often more intense when descending stairs, or getting up from a chair.

IT band syndrome is common in runners who perform unbalanced, repetitive exercise such as running only on one side of a crowned road, or only running one way around a track. Most roads slope off to the sides and running along the edge causes to the outside foot to be lower than the inside foot. This in turn causes the pelvis to tilt to one side and stresses the IT band.

Click HERE to book your bespoke treatment

What can help prevent ITB syndrome?

  • Always have adequate rest/ repair time between training days
  • Regular Maga sports treatments for maintenance
  • Avoid over-training
  • If you train on an uneven road alternate directions daily to create balance.
  • Replace your old trainers
  • Run backwards- as mad as this sounds this will correct muscle imbalance & reduce pressure on the knees
  • Run on a soft, level surface
  • Stretch regularly
  • Use the correct training shoes for your sport
  • Visit a podiatrist to check your foot structure, use orthotics or inserts as necessary

Click here to view an appropriate stretch

Click HERE to book your bespoke treatment

Training for a triathlon? I can help you to improve your performance and prevent injuries.

The competition level of a triathlon is so intense that there is very little of the body that is spared. However, whether its swimming, cycling or running, the majority of the punishment and stress is focused on your legs and arms.

Remember that muscular tension or joint misalignment will affect your performance. Click HERE to book your Deep Tissue | Sport Specific Treatment

Common Triathlon Injuries

Training for, and competing in a triathlon requires hours of rigorous exercise and practice. One of the most common problems associated with the sport of triathlon is overtraining; or not giving your body the rest it requires to stay fit, healthy and injury free. Another major concern, during training and competition is dehydration and exhaustion. It is far too easy to tire out, and forget to keep yourself hydrated, because there are no real rest breaks during the race, simply transitions from one phase to another. You are literally going from one race to another with very little time to catch your breath, let alone be able to drink enough water to keep you safely hydrated. That being said, common injuries include muscle strains, muscle cramps, torn ACL, repetitive strain injuries like rotator cuff tears, sprained ankles, and fall-related breaks, cuts and sbruises. If you are suffering from heat exhaustion, your balance and vision may be affected, and you can easily trip or stumble while running, or fall off of your cycle. A triathlon is hands-down the most strenuous sport in the world, and the list of potential injuries reflects that.

Remember that muscular tension or joint misalignment will affect your performance. Click HERE to book your Deep Tissue | Sport Specific Treatment

Injury Prevention Strategies

The best prevention tip of all is to be as fit, flexible and strong as you can possibly be, before even beginning to train for this type of competition. Strength training for endurance purposes, combined with aerobic and cardiovascular training is also recommended.At some point in your training, it is recommended that you add sprint training in all three phases of the competition, to build up strength endurance in swimming, cycling and running. Top tips to reduce the risk of injuries during triathlon training and competition.

    • Cool Down: Allow an adequate cool-down period and perform after training or competition stretching.
    • Footwear: The majority of the punishment during the running phase of the race will fall on your feet, and the proper footwear can often mean the difference between running injury free or annoying lower leg injuries. Read More About Footwear
    • Gear: You simply have to have the proper gear for every phase of the sport, including a quality cycle helmet and protective eye wear. The importance of maintaining your bike must also be a priority.
    • Rest: After training, you need rest, period. Making sure that you get enough “down-time” and sleep every day, not only on training days, will ensure that your body will adapt to the physical training quicker, and reduces the risk of injuring yourself before you get the chance to compete.
    • Stay Hydrated: Stay well hydrated by drinking water every 20-30 minutes even if you do not feel thirsty. Dehydration leads to fatigue, nausea, and disorientation, all factors that can result in falls and spills.
    • Strength & Conditioning: Strength training leads to reduced potential for injury as it increases the strength of the muscles as well as that of the supporting joints and tendons. Agility training is particularly helpful to the triathlete as it works to improve the ability of the body to quickly adapt to a change in direction, motion and velocity.
    • Stretching: Stiff joints and muscles will ultimately lead to injured joints and muscles so improving the flexibility of the body will also work to decrease the likelihood of injury. Stretching is a key ingredient to any warm up routine and plays an important role in improving flexibility as it increases the range of motion in joints and the elasticity of muscles.
    • Training Aids: Braces and supports can be very beneficial if you have a history of repetitive injuries. Any known weak area of your body should be protected and supported throughout training and competition, especially the joints.
    • Warm Up: Always warm-up properly prior to training and especially competition.

Remember that muscular tension or joint misalignment will affect your performance. Click HERE to book your Deep Tissue | Sport Specific Treatment

A back strain is a pain ful condition where the muscles of the back are injured due to a traumatic pulling and subsequent tearing of the fibres. One of the most common sites of injury, regardless of the sport, is the lower back region. There are many causes for lower back pain, for example, which you may not realise are directly related to sports e.g. I often find that runners who have weak or inflexible hamstrings can experience severe ACUTE back pain as a consequence.

Click HERE to book your bespoke Back Tension reducing treatment

 

Other causes

  • Poor posture is a common cause.
  • A sudden or abrupt movement that causes the muscles to stretch the muscles past their point of elasticity usually causes these injuries.
  • Some back strains are the result of a high velocity impact such as a car accident that causes whiplash etc.
  • Muscle strains can be caused due to repetitive strains. For example, A person who maintains improper posture at a computer on a regular basis or a tennis player who uses improper form may have their muscles tighten to the extent that something as simple as reaching for a salt shaker can cause them to pull a muscle.
  • To add to the pain of a pulled muscle, the surrounding muscles react to the tear by stiffening to protect the injured muscle from further harm .

Recovery time

On average it takes about six weeks to recover from a muscle pull with some relief being felt after about three weeks. Scar tissue will continue to form past six weeks in some cases and as long as a year in severe back strains.

What Do You Do?

The first line of treatment is to support and protect the muscles, help them to loosen up and lessen the pain and minimize any inflammation. After three (or so) weeks, the muscle strain usually benefits from the introduction of mild exercise.

A few measures to ease your back pain

  • Stretching & strengthening
  • Good posture (particularly at work and on the commute)
  • Ice packs
  • Healthy diet
  • Vitamin, Mineral and Herb Supplementation (if necessary)
  • Meditation & breathing exercise to relax your back
  • Regular massage & stretches will assist on both a preventative & curative aspect.

Click HERE to book your bespoke Back Tension reducing treatment

'It's All About ME' | By Dawn SymonsA PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR A HEALTHY BODY AND MIND

 

When you become embroiled in extreme stress and burnout, one of the biggest difficulties is that is that on the surface you appear to be ‘normal’, healthy and well.

Loaded popular beliefs that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME) does not exist, along with labels such such as hypochondriac, attention seeker or lazy, do little to resolve the emotional conflict of this crippling disease.

What I know for sure is that there are things that you can do… I know this to be true because I had to find and do them myself.

I wrote this book because I burned out 3 times. Frantically chasing a solution for my problems made things even worse. But after many long years I found a solution which is the exact opposite of frantic…

Price: £6.97

 




What is Achilles tendonitis?

The Achilles tendon connects the large calf muscles to the heel and provides the power in the push off when walking and running. It is estimated that Achilles Tendonitis accounts for around 10% of all running injuries.

Click HERE to book your targeted leg and foot treatment

Achilles Tendonitis can be either acute, meaning occurring over a period of a few days, following an increase in training, or chronic which occurs over a longer period of time. In addition to being either chronic or acute, the condition can also be either at the attachment point to the heel or in the mid-portion of the tendon (typically around 4cm above the heel). Healing of the Achilles tendon is often slow, due to its poor blood supply.

Acute tendonitis:

  • Gradual onset of pain over a period of days
  • Pain at the onset of exercise which fades as the exercise progresses.
  • Pain eases with rest.
  • Tenderness on palpation.

Chronic Achilles tendonitis may follow on from acute tendonitis if it goes untreated or is not allow sufficient rest. Chronic Achilles tendonitis is a difficult condition to treat, particularly in older athletes who appear to suffer more often.

Chronic tendonitis:

  • Gradual onset of pain over a period of weeks, or even months.
  • Pain with all exercise, which is constant throughout.
  • Pain in the tendon when walking especially up hill or up stairs.
  • Pain and stiffness in the Achilles tendon especially in the morning or after rest.
  • There may be nodules or lumps in the Achilles tendon, particularly 2-4cm above the heel.
  • Tenderness on palpation.
  • Swelling or thickening over the Achilles tendon.
  • There may be redness over the skin.
  • You can sometimes feel a creaking when you press your fingers into the tendon and move the ankle.

Causes of Achilles Tendonitis

  • Achilles tendonitis is an overuse injury. Too much too soon is the basic cause of overuse injuries, however other factors can contribute to developing the condition.
  • Increase in activity (either distance, speed or hills).
  • Less recovery time between activities.
  • Change of footwear or training surface.
  • Weak calf muscles.

REMEMBER ACUTE IS THE FIRST FEW WEEKS. IF YOU IGNORE THE SIGNS YOU WILL TURN THIS INTO A LONG TERM ISSUE………..

Click HERE to book your bespoke tendonitis treatment

Other causes

  • Decreased range of motion at the ankle joint, usually cause by tight calf muscles.
  • Running up hills – the Achilles tendon has to stretch more than normal on every stride. This is fine for a while but will mean the tendon will fatigue sooner than normal.
  • Over-pronation or feet which roll in when running can place an increased strain on the Achilles tendon. As the foot rolls in (flattens) the lower leg also rotates inwards which places twisting stresses on the tendon.
  • Wearing high heels constantly shortens the tendon and calf muscles. When exercising in flat running shoes, the tendon is stretched beyond its normal range which places an ‘abnormal’ strain on the tendon

What Do You Do?

The best advice is not to get it in the first place. However, if you are seeing signs and symptoms you should do the following:

  • Rest and apply cold therapy.
  • Wear a heel pad to raise the heel and take some of the strain off the Achilles tendon. This should only be a temporary measure while the Achilles tendon is healing.
  • Make sure you have the correct running shoes for your foot and type of sport.
  • Regular massage & an injury management programme.

How often should I get a massage?

  • Runners of 30+ miles weekly sessions initially, then every fortnightly maintenance sessions.
  • Runners of less than 30 miles a week- monthly maintenance sessions

Stretch For Achiles Tendonitis…. CLICK HERE.

Click HERE to book your targeted leg and foot treatment

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